Search for more houses at Cas Abou

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Cas Abou 20151008 044 smallThe last time we went to Cas Abou we ended our search for remnants of houses to the North of the plantation house before we reached the last houses on the Werbata map, so we had to come back to complete our search. Also to the East of the road there are a few houses marked on the map in an area that is not cleared by bulldozers. So on Thursday October 8, 2015 the archaeology sleuths gathered once again at 8 AM at the parking lot of the plantation house Cas Abou. From there we walked over the asphalt road first to an area to the East of the road. where we hoped to find our first house. There we entered the vegetation. Rather close to the road we found a pile of small limestones, most probably parts of the wall of the house that was here in the past. In the same area we also found some artifacts, but not many.

We continued through the vegetation to the next houses on the Werbata map. There we found a large field of artifacts but no clear traces of the houses. The artifacts made clear that here was habitation in the past but the houses disappeared without a trace.

We went back to the road and continued to the next location where a house is marked on the map close to a hill top; also this location was rather close to the road; only a few artifacts and no trace of the house. 

Time to cross the road to the other side. First we checked the location of a house that was not present on the Werbata map but it was marked on the Kadaster map of 1962. We found a field of Aloe but no trace of a house. 

The last stop was the location of  two houses that we didn't check the last time even though they were near the location of the two somewhat larger houses on the map. We found parts of the floor and a ridge of plaster with a corner in it indicating remnants of the wall of the former house. Closeby we found the rusted frame of a stretcher and the large bottom stone and the smaller handheld grinding stone which in combination were used to grind corn (maishi chiki) to corn flour.

Fred, Eddy and I lost track of the others and It took us a while to find a good route through the vegetation back to the road; arriving back at the plantation house we found all the others; this time we decided to end our search early. Most of the group made a pitstop at toko Pannekoek to replenish our lost fluids. From there we all went home early,